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Episode 107 – Where’s the Hummus

Posted by Tony on October 28, 2013 in Show-mp3, Show-ogg |
Play

http://smlr.us

Downloads:

MP3 format (for Freedom Haters!)
OGG format (for Freedom Lovers!)
Total Running Time: 1:58:08

Un-edited Live session – http://www.youtube.com/embed/f_mJKAzO42g

Contact Us:

show (at) smlr.us or the Contact us page

Summary

Kernel News: Mat
Time: 19:20
Distro Talk: Tony
Time: 24:24
Mary Distro Review
Time: 35:45
Tech News:
Time: 50:10
Toolbox
Time: 19:45
Security Bit
Time: 1:29:15
Listener Feedback
Time: 1:42:00
Outtro Music
Time: 1:51:45


Where’s the Hummus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hummus

Intro:

Tony Bemus, Mat Enders, and Mary Tomich
Sound bites by Mike Tanner

Kernel News: Mat

Time: 19:20


Distro Talk: Tony

Time: 24:24

Distrowatch.com

  • 10-18 – Edubuntu 13.10
  • 10-18 – UbuntuKylin 13.10
  • 10-18 – Lubuntu 13.10
  • 10-18 – Ubuntu GNOME 13.10
  • 10-18 – Simplicity Linux 13.10
  • 10-19 – CentOS 5.10
  • 10-21 – LinHES 8.0

Distro of the Week: Tony

  1. Mageia – 1660
  2. Ubuntu GNOME – 2424
  3. Debian – 2431
  4. Ubuntu – 3658
  5. Mint – 4224

Mary Distro Review

Time: 35:45


Tech News:

Time: 50:10

Welcome “ownCloud Documents”
http://blog.karlitschek.de/2013/10/welcome-owncloud-documents.html

11 Lesser Known Useful Linux Commands
http://www.tecmint.com/11-lesser-known-useful-linux-commands/
# curl ifconfig.me


The Toolbox – (PDF Toolkit)

Time:

These examples are courtesy of an article by Sid Steward

These examples show you how to perform common PDF tasks from the command-line using pdftk.

Collate scanned pages
pdftk A=even.pdf B=odd.pdf shuffle A B output collated.pdf
or if odd.pdf is in reverse order:
pdftk A=even.pdf B=odd.pdf shuffle A Bend-1 output collated.pdf

Decrypt a PDF
pdftk secured.pdf input_pw foopass output unsecured.pdf

Encrypt a PDF using 128-bit strength (the default), withhold all permissions (the default)
pdftk 1.pdf output 1.128.pdf owner_pw foopass

Same as above, except password baz must also be used to open output PDF
pdftk 1.pdf output 1.128.pdf owner_pw foo user_pw baz

Same as above, except printing is allowed (once the PDF is open)
pdftk 1.pdf output 1.128.pdf owner_pw foo user_pw baz allow printing

Join in1.pdf and in2.pdf into a new PDF, out1.pdf
pdftk in1.pdf in2.pdf cat output out1.pdf

or (using handles):
pdftk A=in1.pdf B=in2.pdf cat A B output out1.pdf

or (using wildcards):
pdftk *.pdf cat output combined.pdf

Remove page 13 from in1.pdf to create out1.pdf
pdftk in.pdf cat 1-12 14-end output out1.pdf
or:
pdftk A=in1.pdf cat A1-12 A14-end output out1.pdf

Apply 40-bit encryption to output, revoking all permissions (the default). Set the owner PW to foopass.
pdftk 1.pdf 2.pdf cat output 3.pdf encrypt_40bit owner_pw foopass

Join two files, one of which requires the password foopass. The output is not encrypted.
pdftk A=secured.pdf 2.pdf input_pw A=foopass cat output 3.pdf

Uncompress PDF page streams for editing the PDF in a text editor (e.g., vim, emacs)
pdftk doc.pdf output doc.unc.pdf uncompress

Repair a PDF’s corrupted XREF table and stream lengths, if possible
pdftk broken.pdf output fixed.pdf

Burst a single PDF document into pages and dump its data to doc_data.txt
pdftk in.pdf burst

Burst a single PDF document into encrypted pages. Allow low-quality printing
pdftk in.pdf burst owner_pw foopass allow DegradedPrinting

Write a report on PDF document metadata and bookmarks to report.txt
pdftk in.pdf dump_data output report.txt

Rotate the first PDF page to 90 degrees clockwise
pdftk in.pdf cat 1east 2-end output out.pdf

Rotate an entire PDF document to 180 degrees
pdftk in.pdf cat 1-endsouth output out.pdf


The Security Bit

Time: 1:29:15
How to Encrypt Files on Linux Using GPG, Ccrypt, Bcrypt and 7-Zip
http://www.maketecheasier.com/encrypt-files-on-linux/

Sign my key:
ID: DB471CEE
Finger Print C447 A702 1EDD 6738 068A 29B1 886C C3F6 DB47 1CEE

PGP: Public Key Servers
http://www.rossde.com/PGP/pgp_keyserv.html


Listener Feedback:

show (at) smlr.us or 313-626-9140
Time: 1:42:00


Outtro Music

Time: 1:51:45

American Dream by Joe Farren

This content is published under the Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

2 Comments

  • Alex says:

    Hey SMLR, that was a truly great show, thanks!

    You raised the question how TrueCrypt could be audited as it is not open source.
    Well, while its license is problematic – one of the reasons most distributions won’t or can’t inlude TrueCrypt – the source code is available, you can compile it yourself.
    One big obvious issue is that you don’t know if the precompiled binaries match the published source code.
    Recently though, a researcher has shown that Truecrypt’s official Windows binaries do indeed match the source code:
    https://madiba.encs.concordia.ca/~x_decarn/truecrypt-binaries-analysis/

    So at least we know they don’t sneak in a backdoor into the binaries; now it’s up to the researchers to audit the source code.
    This has long been overdue.
    How have we been using unaudited crypto software from unknown devs, published under an odd license for so long?! That’s absurd.

  • Lea says:

    Open source developers want to help. There is a petition on whitehouse.gov to release all healthcare.gov source code:

    “Code funded by taxpaying citizens should be made available to the general public as government funded development is generally public domain software. Please release the code so we may help fix any found issues.”

    Petition

    News story

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